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Water Around the World

NASA VISIBLE EARTH: WATER QUALITY SATELLITE IMAGERY

November 2, 2016

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NASA Visible Earth shares its gallery of satellite imagery displaying visible water quality indicators from around the world. See how algal blooms have increased in Lake Michigan, how Hurricane Gonzalo shook up sediment in Bermuda, and forty-two other beautiful and fascinating images.

See NASA Visible Earth’s Water Quality Gallery: http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/view_cat.php?categoryID=797

Can you find an image with very turbid water?

Can you find an image with algal blooms?


Water Around the World

THE DELAWARE RIVER WATERSHED

July 2, 2016

A Watershed Moment from Open Space Institute on Vimeo.

This video from Open Space Institute describes the Delaware River Watershed and the series of nonpoint pollutants threatening its water quality. The Delaware River Watershed runs from the forests of New York to the Delaware coast, and provides drinking water for nearly 15 million Americans. The watershed community is coming together, across state and municipal lines, to help combat the effects that forests, farms, cities, and suburbs are having on their watershed to help “leave it better than they found it”.

What are three things causing stress on the Delaware River Watershed?

What is your local watershed?


Water Around the World

WATERMARK, A DOCUMENTARY ON WATER

December 8, 2015

watermark-movie

Watermark is a documentary from filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nick de Pencier along with renowned photographer Edward Burtynsky. The film shows the history and use of water around the world, with segments shot in ten different countries. Watermark is the third part of Burtynsky’s Water project which also includes a book and photographic exhibition.

Watermark makes a great companion to the WQI Project. We suggest watching it before Objective 1 as an introduction or during Objective 3 as part of the global water discussion. Additionally, Watermark has its own educator guide that features many interesting classroom applications and resources.

Watch the Movie
Watermark Educator Guide
Edward Burtynsky’s Water Photo Series

Water Around the World

“WHY DID L.A. DROP 96 MILLION ‘SHADE BALLS’ INTO ITS WATER?”

August 14, 2015

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National Geographic explains why Los Angeles, in the midst of the ongoing drought, looked to millions of small plastic “shade balls” to protect their water quality.

Read the full story here: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/150812-shade-balls-los-angeles-California-drought-water-environment/

How do the “shade balls” help protect water quality?
What are other ways Los Angeles could cut down on their water usage?

Water Around the World

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SPOTLIGHTS EXTREME ALGAE BLOOMS

August 10, 2015

National-geographic-algae-bloom

National Geographic spotlights extreme algae blooms happening around the world. Follow the link to view striking photographs and read about how algae blooms form, why they are so dangerous, and how we can work to stop them.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/04/pictures/130423-extreme-algae-bloom-fertilizer-lake-erie-science/

What effect do you think algae blooms have on aquatic life?
What can we do to help avoid algae blooms?

Water Around the World

ROBOT SWANS BRING NEW TECHNOLOGY TO WATER TESTING

July 24, 2015

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Channel NewsAsia reports that Singapore researchers are testing robotic swans that could provide advanced water testing data. These swans are equipped with sensors that could provide real-time water quality data for factors including pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and chlorophyll.

Read the full article and watch the videos: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/robot-swans-bring-new/1958380.html

What do you think of the robot swans?
How could real-time robotic water testing be valuable?

 


Water Around the World

PINK SALMON STRUGGLE AS FRESHWATER BECOMES ACIDIC

July 5, 2015

Scientific American and Climatewire report pink salmon are giving scientist clues on how acidic water will affect future wildlife.

Read the report here: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/pink-salmon-struggle-as-freshwater-becomes-acidic/

How do you think the impaired senses of the salmon could possibly affect our ecosystem?
What can we do help make our freshwater less acidic?